SHIELD

Tissue Preservation - Highlighted pipeline icon

Exceptional tissue preservation

Published by Park et al. in Nature Biotechnology 2018, our SHIELD reagent (AKA GE38) safeguards endogenous fluorescence, protein antigenicity, nucleic acids, and overall tissue architecture against physical and chemical stressors. The SHIELD tissue preservation method also protects tissue during fluorescent protein imaging and antibody labeling across multiple rounds.

Compatible with:

GFP+ motor cortical neurons in whole mouse brain (left) and tdTomato+ in a mouse spinal cord cell-type (right)
Left: GFP+ motor cortical neurons, sample courtesy of Dr. Byungkook Lim, UCSD. Right: RFP+ spinal cord cells, sample courtesy of Dr. Helen Lai, UT Southwestern. Both imaged with SmartSPIM.

Quick & easy tissue preservation protocol

Our streamlined protocol takes just 4-6 days, without the variability of tissue embedding via hydrogel or paraffin. Reagents are non-toxic and can be easily disposed of after use.

Figure showing SHIELD tissue preservation mechanism

Two SHIELD kit sizes

250 mL: Preserves 25 whole mouse brains or comparably sized samples.

  • 250 mL SH-Epoxy
  • 125 mL SH-Buffer
  • 500 mL SH-ON

500 mL: Preserves 50 whole mouse brains or comparably sized samples.

  • 500 mL SH-Epoxy
  • 250 mL SH-Buffer
  • 1000 mL SH-ON
SHIELD reagent bottles

Recent publications citing SHIELD

Integrated platform for multiscale molecular imaging and phenotyping of the human brain

Juhyuk Park†, Ji Wang†, Webster Guan†, Lars A. Gjesteby, Dylan Pollack, Lee Kamentsky, Nicholas B. Evans, Jeff Stirman, Xinyi Gu, Chuanxi Zhao, Slayton Marx, Minyoung E. Kim, Seo Woo Choi, Michael Snyder, David Chavez, Clover Su-Arcaro, Yuxuan Tian, Chang Sin Park, Qiangge Zhang, Dae Hee Yun, Mira Moukheiber, Guoping Feng, X. William Yang, C. Dirk Keene, Patrick R. Hof, Satrajit S. Ghosh, Matthew P. Frosch, Laura J. Brattain, Kwanghun Chung*

Journal:
Science
Publication Date:
Tissue Species:
Human
Tissue Type:
Brain
Products Cited:
SHIELD, Megatome, MegaSPIM
Phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase inversely associates with neuronal activity.

Dong Yang, Yu Wang, Tianbo Qi, Xi Zhang, Leyao Shen, Jingrui Ma, Zhengyuan Pang, Neeraj K. Lal, Daniel B. McClatchy, Saba Heydari Seradj, Verina H. Leung, Kristina Wang, Yi Xie, Filip S. Polli, Anton Maximov, Oscar Christian Gonzalez, Luis de Lecea, Hollis T. Cline, Vineet Augustine, John R. Yates III, and Li Ye.

Journal:
Neuron
Publication Date:
Research Area:
Neural Circuits, Neural Interfaces
Tissue Species:
Mouse
Tissue Type:
Brain
Products Cited:
SHIELD, EasyIndex, SmartBatch+, SmartSPIM, SmartAnalytics, CRO Services
Opioid-driven disruption of the septal complex reveals a role for neurotensin-expressing neurons in withdrawal

Rhiana C. Simon, Weston T. Fleming, Pranav Senthilkumar, Brandy A. Briones1,2, Kentaro K. Ishii, Madelyn M. Hjort, Madison M. Martin, Koichi Hashikawa, Andrea D. Sanders, Sam A. Golden, Garret D. Stuber.

Journal:
bioRxiv
Publication Date:
Research Area:
Neural Circuits, Other
Tissue Species:
Mouse
Tissue Type:
Brain
Products Cited:
SHIELD, EasyIndex, SmartClear, SmartSPIM

Further reading